NEWS & EVENTS‎ > ‎

June 30 - Parking Resources

posted Jun 30, 2014, 6:32 PM by PJ Brennan
Parking becomes a hot topic for discussion any time new development is introduced to the City.  In the case of 4700 Berwyn House Road, neighbors find themselves asking if there is going to be sufficient parking for residents and their guests; and how will street parking and traffic be affected as the area becomes more densely populated.

The Approved Central US1 Corridor Sector Plan and Sectional Amendment Map (June 2010), authored by the The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, serves as a guideline for new development in our City and specifically addresses parking. On page 239 of the Sector Plan, residential development plans within the "walkable node" requires a ratio of 1 parking space for every 1 dwelling unit. This ratio accounts for the different type of units and the possibility of renters with or without vehicles, as well as the desired urban fabric that the City hopes to achieve. The development at 4700 Berwyn House Road exceeds the ratio set by the plan with 1.2 parking spaces per dwelling, which falls in line with the ratio of other city-wide development:

                        Total Units  Total Retail (SF)  Total Parking  Parking Ratio 
 4700 Berwyn House Rd.    275  530  318  1.2 
 Domain   256  *10,000  380  1.5 
 Metropolitan 238  *4,133  366  1.5 
 Monument 234  *4,800  335  1.4 
 The Varsity  258  *20,019  242  1.0 
 University View 1  352   450  1.0 
 University View 2   154  *11,600   0 
 The Enclave (phase 1)    94  *9,487  351  4.0 

*Keep in mind, commercial space has a different ratio for parking: 3 spaces for every 1,000 SF in the "walkable node," so the residential ratios above are even lower where retail square footage is significant.

Regardless of available structured parking, unless it's free, non-permitted areas will continue to experience students and other visitors taking advantage of the free parking (i.e. 48th Avenue, Tecumseh Street, and as far back as Potomac Avenue). Permit parking may be inevitable for our communities and can be an effective tool to have a level of control over the situation. 

The City can also restrict residents of high rise facilities with designated parking from obtaining City residential street parking permits. This helps to reduce the use of already scarce street parking and prevents high-rise residents from abusing permit parking privileges, leaving parking available for residential permit holders as well as visitors and patrons using the street parking within the posted limit.
Comments